The arts therapies and counselling in schools

The Arts Therapies and Play Therapy

Arts therapists are both artists and clinicians. Trained in both their art form and psychological therapy, they provide a sound psychological framework which include assessment and evaluation techniques. The arts therapies use creativity and imagination to help build self-esteem, improve communication and practice social skills in a therapeutic environment.

The arts therapies helps those who may find ‘talking therapy’ challenging. It supports a person in discovering and developing different forms of communication. For example: developing a ’fictional story’ which mirrors a real life event, using rhythmic games in a group to encourage working with others, creating a safe space to explore attachment and relationships.

There are three registered, legislated Arts based therapies in the UK, Dramatherapy, Music Therapy and Art Therapy.  To be an Arts Therapist a practitioner must be qualified to an MA standard and are required to be registered with the Health Care Professions Council: www.hcpc-uk.co.uk

Play Therapy is legislated by Play Therapy UK, but not currently a protected title (i.e. anyone can call themselves a Play Therapist or Play Specialist but may not be qualified). NESSie ensures our Play Therapists are qualified and on a list of recognised practitioners at: www.playtherapy.org.uk 

Below is a brief description of the different Arts Therapies: 

 

Dramatherapy

Clients who are referred to a Dramatherapist do not need to have previous experience or skill in acting, theatre or drama. Dramatherapists are trained to enable clients to find the most suitable medium for them to engage in group or individual therapy to address and resolve, or make troubling issues more bearable.

Dramatherapy is a form of psychological therapy in which all of the performance arts are utilised within the therapeutic relationship. Dramatherapists are both artists and clinicians and draw on their trainings in theatre/drama and therapy to create methods to engage clients in effecting psychological, emotional and social changes. The therapy gives equal validity to body and mind within the dramatic context; stories, myths, playtexts, puppetry, masks and improvisation are examples of the range of artistic interventions a Dramatherapist may employ. These will enable the client to explore difficult and painful life experiences through an indirect approach.

(2011 British Association of Dramatherapists)

 To find out more please visit the British Association of Dramatherapists: www.badth.org.uk

Art Therapy

Art therapy is a form of psychotherapy that uses art media as its primary mode of expression and communication. Within this context, art is not used as diagnostic tool but as a medium to address emotional issues which may be confusing and distressing. 

Although influenced by psychoanalysis, art therapists have been inspired by theories such as attachment-based psychotherapy and have developed a broad range of client-centred approaches such as psycho-educational, mindfulness and mentalization-based treatments, compassion-focussed and cognitive analytic therapies, and socially engaged practice.  

                                                                              (2018 British Association of Art Therapists)

 

To find out more please visit the British Association of Art Therapists: www.baat.org.uk

Music Therapy

Music plays an important role in our everyday lives. It can be exciting or calming, joyful or poignant, can stir memories and powerfully resonate with our feelings, helping us to express them and to communicate with others.

Music therapy uses these qualities and the musical components of rhythm, melody and tonality to provide a means of relating within a therapeutic relationship. In music therapy, people work with a wide range of accessible instruments and their voices to create a musical language which reflects their emotional and physical condition; this enables them to build connections with their inner selves and with others around them.

(2017 British Association of Music Therapists)

To find out more please visit the British Association of Music Therapists: www.bamt.org

Play Therapy

Music plays an important role in our everyday lives. It can be exciting or calming, joyful or poignant, can stir memories and powerfully resonate with our feelings, helping us to express them and to communicate with others.

 

Music therapy uses these qualities and the musical components of rhythm, melody and tonality to provide a means of relating within a therapeutic relationship. In music therapy, people work with a wide range of accessible instruments and their voices to create a musical language which reflects their emotional and physical condition; this enables them to build connections with their inner selves and with others around them.

                                                                           (2017 British Association of Music Therapists)

To find out more please visit the British Association of Music Therapists: www.bamt.org